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Word of The Day

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Bletherskite - someone who just won't shut the hell up, even though you wish they would. Can make the sufferer feel angry or violent, often both at the same time. In extreme cases, it can bring out the vengeful side in people. So, when someone calls you a bletherskite, the best thing to do is SHUT UP!
Ghosts, flamingos, guitars and vodka. Eclectic subjects, eccentric stories:

Humorous guide & Recommended Read =^.^= How To Make a Cup of Tea
A flash fiction series :) A Random Moment in Time
Editors' Pick! :D I Am The Deep, Dark Woods
And another EP!: The Fragility of Age
=^.^=
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Invigorate - give strength or energy to
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Athwart


Adverb
1 : from side to side; crosswise.
2 : Nautical.

at right angles to the fore-and-aft line; across.
broadside to the wind because of equal and opposite pressures of wind and tide:
a ship riding athwart.

3 : perversely; awry; wrongly.

Preposition
4 : from side to side of; across.
5 : Nautical. across the direction or course of.
6 : in opposition to; contrary to.

WotD because I like both the sound of it and the various definitions.
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Rapacious: grasping; extortionate; predatory

A sinister-sounding word with quite unpleasant definitions...
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Runcible : 1871, a nonsense word coined by Edward Lear; used especially in runcible spoon "spoon with three short tines like a fork," which first took the name 1926.

WotD because why not? It is used in Lear's poem The Owl and the Pussy-cat, a most delightful, endearing piece of rhyme.
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Flabbergasted
That is how I feel right now, but it also is a very funny word. I mean, what is my flabber and how would that be gasted?
If life seems jolly rotten
there's something you've forgotten
and that's to laugh and smile and dance and sing

from Monty Python's "Life of Brian"
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Afire!

For some reason, I always want to end this one with an exclamation mark.

afire (əˈfaɪə)
adv, adj (postpositive)
1. on fire; ablaze
2. intensely interested or passionate.

I love the sound of the word. The feel of it, and just the way it comes out of the mouth.

On a rather different note, have you ever tried saying bubbles in an angry voice? It's impossible! It's just too joyous a word.

Afire is my word for Friday and bubbles is my word for Saturday.
Ghosts, flamingos, guitars and vodka. Eclectic subjects, eccentric stories:

Humorous guide & Recommended Read =^.^= How To Make a Cup of Tea
A flash fiction series :) A Random Moment in Time
Editors' Pick! :D I Am The Deep, Dark Woods
And another EP!: The Fragility of Age
=^.^=
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Haberdasher : 1. a retail dealer in men's furnishings, as shirts, ties, gloves, socks, and hats.
2. A dealer in small articles for sewing, such as buttons, zips, and ribbons

WotD because I was at such a shop yesterday. Here in France it is called a mercerie, which led me to think of the word, haberdasher. If it is split in two, it gives haber dasher, which could be an interesting fictional creature or even a name for a character in a story.

Then I got to wondering about the origin of the word, and looked it up.



Word Origin and History for haberdasher
n.

early 14c., "seller of various small articles of trade" (late 13c. as a surname), agent noun from Anglo-French hapertas "small wares," also a kind of fabric, of unknown origin. Sense of "dealer in men's wares" is 1887 in American English, via intermediate sense of "seller of caps."



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Haberdasher : 1. a retail dealer in men's furnishings, as shirts, ties, gloves, socks, and hats.
2. A dealer in small articles for sewing, such as buttons, zips, and ribbons

WotD because I was at such a shop yesterday. Here in France it is called a mercerie, which led me to think of the word, haberdasher. If it is split in two, it gives haber dasher, which could be an interesting fictional creature or even a name for a character in a story.

Then I got to wondering about the origin of the word, and looked it up.



Word Origin and History for haberdasher
n.

early 14c., "seller of various small articles of trade" (late 13c. as a surname), agent noun from Anglo-French hapertas "small wares," also a kind of fabric, of unknown origin. Sense of "dealer in men's wares" is 1887 in American English, via intermediate sense of "seller of caps."





Ah, that's one of my favourite words smile There's this place in Paisley, just a stone's throw away from me, called Helen's Haberdashery. I always loved the alliteration, and the feel of the word 'haberdashery'. It made me laugh, but also had this nostalgic feeling to it. I mentioned where the haberdasher is, because Paisley used to be one of the biggest makers of fabric. They even had streets named after what were made, like Silk Street.

So, with that in mind, my word of the day is "nostalgia". Wikipedia link.
Ghosts, flamingos, guitars and vodka. Eclectic subjects, eccentric stories:

Humorous guide & Recommended Read =^.^= How To Make a Cup of Tea
A flash fiction series :) A Random Moment in Time
Editors' Pick! :D I Am The Deep, Dark Woods
And another EP!: The Fragility of Age
=^.^=
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Quote by gypsy
Haberdasher : 1. a retail dealer in men's furnishings, as shirts, ties, gloves, socks, and hats.
2. A dealer in small articles for sewing, such as buttons, zips, and ribbons

WotD because I was at such a shop yesterday. Here in France it is called a mercerie, which led me to think of the word, haberdasher. If it is split in two, it gives haber dasher, which could be an interesting fictional creature or even a name for a character in a story.

Then I got to wondering about the origin of the word, and looked it up.



Word Origin and History for haberdasher
n.

early 14c., "seller of various small articles of trade" (late 13c. as a surname), agent noun from Anglo-French hapertas "small wares," also a kind of fabric, of unknown origin. Sense of "dealer in men's wares" is 1887 in American English, via intermediate sense of "seller of caps."





Ah, that's one of my favourite words smile There's this place in Paisley, just a stone's throw away from me, called Helen's Haberdashery. I always loved the alliteration, and the feel of the word 'haberdashery'. It made me laugh, but also had this nostalgic feeling to it. I mentioned where the haberdasher is, because Paisley used to be one of the biggest makers of fabric. They even had streets named after what were made, like Silk Street.

So, with that in mind, my word of the day is "nostalgia". Wikipedia link.


Helen's Haberdashery has a wonderful feel to it, in part because of the alliteration, but also due to both words starting with H.

Paisley was incredibly important in the textile trades! The design referred to as paisley was given its name because the large shawls in fashion during several decades of the 19th century were woven there, at least within the British weaving industry. Those were only possible because of the invention of the Jacquard loom here in France. Here, they are known as Cachemires, because they evolved from textiles that came from highly skilled tradional weavers in the Kashmir region of Asia. The traditional patterns and designs are based on flower and plant forms. The history of these particular textiles is fascinating, and I've seen some stunning examples of them in different museums.

Nostalgia is a wonderful word. Good choice.
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mendacious:

a word that sounds rather grand and important, which belies its meaning: lying, untruthful
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"Oftener". It doesn't sound like it's a word, but it is, according to OED http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/often it's a cool archaism, which I may find myself using in a story or poem at some juncture.
Ghosts, flamingos, guitars and vodka. Eclectic subjects, eccentric stories:

Humorous guide & Recommended Read =^.^= How To Make a Cup of Tea
A flash fiction series :) A Random Moment in Time
Editors' Pick! :D I Am The Deep, Dark Woods
And another EP!: The Fragility of Age
=^.^=
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HUMILTY: the quality or condition of being humble
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Portmanteau


n. 1580s, "traveling case or bag for clothes and other necessaries," from Middle French portemanteau "traveling bag," originally "court official who carried a prince's mantle" (1540s), from porte, imperative of porter "to carry" (see porter (n.1)) + manteau "cloak" (see mantle (n.)).

Portmanteau word "word blending the sound of two different words" (1882), coined by "Lewis Carroll" (Charles L. Dodgson, 1832-1898) for the sort of words he invented for "Jabberwocky," on notion of "two meanings packed up into one word." As a noun in this sense from 1872.

WoTD because whenever I come across its use in English to describe a "portmanteau word", it takes me aback. I know the word primarily in French, and "manteau" means "coat", in modern French.

It doesn't surprise me that it was Lewis Carroll who coined the usage for portmanteau word.
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Stress because I feel stressed at the weekend. A certain family member is very stressful to be around. But also because it is quite a good multifunctional word:

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/stress
Ghosts, flamingos, guitars and vodka. Eclectic subjects, eccentric stories:

Humorous guide & Recommended Read =^.^= How To Make a Cup of Tea
A flash fiction series :) A Random Moment in Time
Editors' Pick! :D I Am The Deep, Dark Woods
And another EP!: The Fragility of Age
=^.^=
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A bit of a strange one today: Rumplefyke. It is Scottish, meaning to have an itchy arse. I can't remember if this has already been one of my WoTD selections, but if it has, it deserves to be again, simply because it's funny.
Ghosts, flamingos, guitars and vodka. Eclectic subjects, eccentric stories:

Humorous guide & Recommended Read =^.^= How To Make a Cup of Tea
A flash fiction series :) A Random Moment in Time
Editors' Pick! :D I Am The Deep, Dark Woods
And another EP!: The Fragility of Age
=^.^=
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Limerence - The feelings and emotions (excitement, nervousness, etc.) you experience when you have a crush on somebody, combined with an overwhelming, obsessive need to have your feelings reciprocated.

Usage : Prolonged exposure to Friend-zone is the leading cause of Limerence.
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"Oftener". It doesn't sound like it's a word, but it is, according to OED http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/often it's a cool archaism, which I may find myself using in a story or poem at some juncture.



surely you missed a golden opportunity to use the word straight away, right here? You could have pledged to use the word 'oftener' oftener


Syllepsis: a figure of speech in which a word is applied to two others in different senses: I caught the bus and the flu or to two others of which it gramatically suits one only: neither they nor it is working
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Effulgent : adjective, shining forth brilliantly; radiant.

WotD because there are more hours of daylight now, and today, for a change, the sun is shining. That is a pleasant change from the rain, overcast skies, and low lying cloud cover that's been the norm lately. At least here, where I live.
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Uft.

A somewhat nonsense expression, used to convey boredom or disbelief.

"That cop pulled me over, just for the fun of it!"

"Uft, what a bamstick!"


I meant to comment on this one. I didn't know the word uft before, thank you.

The last two letters can be preceded by most of the vowels to form words:

Aft - adverb
1. at, close to, or toward the stern or tail:
Stow the luggage aft.
adjective 2. situated toward or at the stern or tail: The aft sail was luffing.


Eft - noun 1.
a newt, especially the eastern newt, Notophthalmus viridescens (red eft) in its immature terrestrial stage.
2. Obsolete. a lizard.

Oft - adverb, Literary. 1. often.

And of course...

Uft

And now yft, which I just made up, lol. It's a contraction of a different spelling for "if" and "thee" or "ye".

"Yft'e dinna mind, I'll hai a wee dram with me tea."

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I meant to comment on this one. I didn't know the word uft before, thank you.

The last two letters can be preceded by most of the vowels to form words:

Aft - adverb
1. at, close to, or toward the stern or tail:
Stow the luggage aft.
adjective 2. situated toward or at the stern or tail: The aft sail was luffing.


Eft - noun 1.
a newt, especially the eastern newt, Notophthalmus viridescens (red eft) in its immature terrestrial stage.
2. Obsolete. a lizard.

Oft - adverb, Literary. 1. often.

And of course...

Uft

And now yft, which I just made up, lol. It's a contraction of a different spelling for "if" and "thee" or "ye".

"Yft'e dinna mind, I'll hai a wee dram with me tea."



That's pretty danged good. There's also another modification that can be made, this time to 'eft', by putting 'er' after it, you get 'efter', a Glasgwegian slang word for 'after'. I don't know why Glaswegians mangle both Scottish and English words, but we do it so well, that sometimes it confuses people smile
Ghosts, flamingos, guitars and vodka. Eclectic subjects, eccentric stories:

Humorous guide & Recommended Read =^.^= How To Make a Cup of Tea
A flash fiction series :) A Random Moment in Time
Editors' Pick! :D I Am The Deep, Dark Woods
And another EP!: The Fragility of Age
=^.^=
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Quote by Circle_Something

That's pretty danged good. There's also another modification that can be made, this time to 'eft', by putting 'er' after it, you get 'efter', a Glasgwegian slang word for 'after'. I don't know why Glaswegians mangle both Scottish and English words, but we do it so well, that sometimes it confuses people smile


Thank you! I had fun with it, and efter is a good one too.

Possible combinations for all of them have been going through my mind, and it turns out the 'ft' ending is quite useful. Here a those for aft, and only adding one letter before the a:

daft
haft
raft
saft
waft

So today's WotD is saft, a Scot word for soft.

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So today's WotD is saft, a Scot word for soft.

An excellent word. Saft is also the German word for juice and whwn you add an "n", you get sanft, which means gentle or careful.
If life seems jolly rotten
there's something you've forgotten
and that's to laugh and smile and dance and sing

from Monty Python's "Life of Brian"
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Quote by paulus

An excellent word. Saft is also the German word for juice and whwn you add an "n", you get sanft, which means gentle or careful.


Very interesting. Sanft is a lovely word - how is it pronounced? Are all the letters enunciated?
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Quote by paulus

An excellent word. Saft is also the German word for juice and whwn you add an "n", you get sanft, which means gentle or careful.


Very interesting. Sanft is a lovely word - how is it pronounced? Are all the letters enunciated?

Hard to explain to someone speaking English, I don't know phonetic script, but I'll try:
The S is pronounced as a Z in Germany, the letter A sounds like the A in Bart, all the letters are pronounced. Does that make it a bit clearer?
If life seems jolly rotten
there's something you've forgotten
and that's to laugh and smile and dance and sing

from Monty Python's "Life of Brian"
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Quote by paulus

Hard to explain to someone speaking English, I don't know phonetic script, but I'll try:
The S is pronounced as a Z in Germany, the letter A sounds like the A in Bart, all the letters are pronounced. Does that make it a bit clearer?


Yes, it does. Thank you.
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Today's word is sorrow.

Because that is how the tragic events of this week have left so many people feeling.
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susurration: a whispering or rustling sound